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The Deception Behind Indigenous Cultural Preservation Disrobing the Aboriginal Industry argues that the policies proposed to address these problems - land.
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Watson, of St. Vincent College in Latrobe, Penn.

Academics should be able to explore politically uncomfortable truths without fear of reprisal, he says. Widdowson and her husband, Albert Howard, who co-wrote the book, have received phone calls of support.

Many people agree with her, says Tom Flanagan, a political science prof at the University of Calgary, and are thankful she has dared to tackle this topic. By defining hate speech broadly—and using it as a label for anything that causes offence—the CPSA could sideline her. Next federal election platform guide: Where the parties stand on everything.

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Disrobing the Aboriginal Industry : Frances Widdowson :

In spite of the fact that the AFOA was created to help aboriginal communities meet their accountability obligations, 15 years and millions of dollars later the association comes out against the audits with the veiled threat that they can "compromise the relationship" between aboriginal peoples and the Crown. The conflict-oriented and inept nature of aboriginal policy in Canada emerged historically out of the constant efforts by governments to offload their responsibility for aboriginal peoples.

This began with the residential schools, where responsibility for education was offloaded to the churches. Offloading is continuing through the publicizing of recipient audits. Instead of holding aboriginal governments to account, the government is leaving this up to community members. Similarly, the government does not provide high quality education, health care and housing to aboriginal communities.

It transfers funds to the aboriginal leadership to arrange for these services, and when that money is squandered on sinecures, travel and consultancy fees, the government's solution is to advertise this malfeasance on its website. This will do nothing to "improve community living conditions" for native people, but will deflect the blame for the continuing policy failure.

I’m Aboriginal, But I’m Not…

Self-government proponents demand that more responsibilities be given to aboriginal communities because aboriginal "nations" should have control over the programs and services properly provided by provincial and federal levels of government. The lack of expertise and capacity in dependent and isolated tribal entities results in very low levels of service provided. Millions of dollars are also diverted to the various "experts" that work in aboriginal organizations such as the AFOA, aboriginal child welfare agencies and indigenous cultural institutes.

Demanding "accountability" and "transparency" that can never be realized in small and poorly-functioning tribal communities is ineffective and hugely wasteful. Were the government to accept its responsibility to native people, and become accountable for providing education, health care and housing, it would be the first step in eliminating the nepotism, resource squandering and entitlement orchestrated by the Aboriginal Industry.

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Why aboriginal audits miss the real problem

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Frances Widdowson and Albert Howard. Contributed to The Globe and Mail. Published April 9, Updated February 18, Comments Please log in to bookmark this story. Log In Create Free Account. Find your bookmarks by selecting your profile name.


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